Warwick History of Violence Network Workshop

Friday 13 May 2016

S0.19 Social Sciences Building, University of Warwick

10-30 Reception and Coffee

11-00 – 11.30 – Keynote introduction

Richard Bessel (York),  Violence: A Modern Obsession

11.30 – 1-00 – Revolutionary Violence: Theory and Practice

Steve Smith (All Souls), Revolutionary violence

Philippe le Goff (Kingston), Auguste Blanqui and the question of violence

Alistair Dickins (Manchester), Rewriting a Violent Script? The Fear of Popular Unrest in the Russian Revolution, 1917

1-00 – 1-45 – Lunch Break

1-45 – 3-30 – War, Race, Drugs and Violence

Pierre Purseigle (Warwick), War, violence, and solidarity. The urban experience of the First World War

Ben Smith (Warwick), Mexican cartels and the Drugs Wars

Michael Fleming (Warwick),  Narrating antisemitic violence to the British governing class: The Weekly Political Intelligence Summary and the Holocaust.

Brendan McGeever (Birkbeck),  Antisemitic Violence and Revolutionary Politics in the Russian Revolution, 1917-1919

3-30 – 4-00 – Break

4-00 – 4-30

Summary of the Day – Future Plans

Chris Read & Jonathan Davies (Warwick)


Getting to Warwick: By car – There are a number of car parks on campus. For Social Sciences Car Parks 8, 10 and 15 are within five minutes walk. (Pay and Display – £3 for full day). Postcode for satnav: CV4 7AL

By Train: Coventry Station then taxi or bus no 12X, 11 and 11U from station forecourt –to the campus  (30 mins approx)

Full details on University website: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/about/visiting/directions/

 

THERE IS NO FEE BUT WOULD ANYONE OTHER THAN SPEAKERS PLANNING TO ATTEND PLEASE CONTACT ONE OF THE CONVENORS SO WE CAN ESTIMATE CATERING REQUIREMENTS ETC.

Violence and solidarity. Urban experiences of the First World War

Keynote Lecture given at the conference Cities and Wars, Instituto de História Contemporânea, Lisbon, 27 September 2012

The outbreak of the war in August 1914 heralded a critical redefinition of the role of civilians in war, as the conflict challenged conventional understanding of the relationship between the business of war and the organization of modern civil society. The experience of cities and towns across combatant nations testify to this transformation and to the subsequent emergence of contemporary belligerence. This paper will suggest that the violence of the battlefront underpinned, rather than undermined, the discourses and practices of solidarities which lay at the core of the mobilization of the home fronts. My objective is to suggest some of the ways in which we may consider the dialectical and ambivalent articulation of violence and solidarity, of participation and victimization.

Such an emphasis on both solidarity and coercion also stresses the importance of contention in the urban experience of the war. This paper will indeed argue that urban civil societies ensured, to a large extent, the success of national mobilization in WWI. It is also perhaps at that level that the contingent, ongoing, and contested nature of these mobilizations appears most clearly.

Central to the experience of military conflict, violence and coercion do not exhaust the war experience. In towns and cities across belligerent nations, solidarity, as much as violence and coercion, had defined the conflict. The history of urban mobilization must as a consequence be placed at the heart of our reflections on the social history of violence in the twentieth century.

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